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  • Kate 14:27 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    Richard Henry Bain has succeeded in getting another delay in his trial, jury selection meant to begin next May. His lawyer says Bain was suffering from the effects of an antidepressant when he carried out his attack. I’m not going to put in “alleged” here because there’s no doubt about who acted, although the degree and kind of guilt remains to be ascertained.

    (Given that almost everyone is taking some form of legal psychoactive medication these days, what will it mean for jurisprudence if a court agrees that an antidepressant could make a guy kill somebody?)

     
    • Blork 15:27 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      I guess they’ll have to come up with a pill for that.

  • Kate 14:17 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    The app Montréal en histoires is getting a lot of notice. I haven’t tried it yet, but it offers sixty locations where you can experience snippets of the city’s history.

     
  • Kate 10:53 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    Media are getting extra mileage this week out of their old photos of Gérald Tremblay looking tight-lipped and grim. The Journal says Tremblay is among the 15 big names in the water meter documents. La Presse’s Kathleen Lévesque says it looks like a vast conspiracy.

    And now the UPAC is visiting Bernard Trépanier, aka Monsieur 3%.

     
  • Kate 10:49 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    The Journal notes that calèche horses were working all day Wednesday despite a law saying horses need to be rested when it’s 30° or more. It reached 31° Wednesday afternoon.

     
  • Kate 10:47 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    Global has a nice list of five car-free day trips from Montreal, taking intercity buses or even AMT trains.

     
    • Viviane 10:57 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      The hike up the Saint-Hilaire mountain is nice and very popular, but you’d probably want to take a taxi to get there once you arrive in town.

    • Mathieu 11:16 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Besides, it’s impossible to take a train for a day trip to Mont-Saint-Hilaire as they suggest. The trains are leaving St-Hilaire in the morning and going back in the evening.

    • EmilyG 11:28 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Thanks for the link. I don’t drive much (or far), so I appreciate learning about places I can go without a car.

    • Viviane 11:36 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Indeed Mathieu, a better option on week-ends would be to take the 200 bus line from the Longueuil metro station. See http://www.citvr.ca/circuits-et-horaires/circuits-regionaux/200-direction-saint-hyacinthe (Sorry, I still haven’t figured out the “secret” code to insert links).

    • ant6n 22:10 on 2015/07/31 Permalink

      @Vivaine
      just standard html a href tags.

  • Kate 10:39 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    In the Globe and Mail, Yves Boisvert writes about Denis Coderre’s passion for sports and the revival of a baseball team here: “It is estimated that the cost of buying a team and building a stadium would be more than $1 billion. A new ball park that could seat 36,000 spectators would cost around $500 million, according to Ernst & Young. The firm concluded the team would be profitable […] provided, of course, that two-thirds of the privately owned stadium would be paid for with public money.”

    In the Gazette, one Michelle Pucci looks at the pros and cons: “According to Harvard scholar Judith Grant Long, taxpayers end up footing about 78 per cent of the bill for the average professional sports facility.” Pucci points to a Globe & Mail piece from earlier this month about how spending public money on sports venues is a mug’s game.

    (“Montreal is one of the only big cities in North America without a major league team” – well, is it the only one? Or isn’t it? I always itch when I see “one of the only” because it’s a journalist putting up a big sign saying “Maybe it is, but I couldn’t be bothered to check.”)

    General warnings for article limits on both the Globe and Gazette, of course.

     
    • Bill Binns 10:49 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Agreed. “One of the only”, “refused to condemn”, “some people are saying”. All tools for lazy journalists.

      Where is the opposition to Coderre’s baseball ambitions? The CAQ should be all over this.

    • Ian 10:49 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      I think the reasoning there is that defining a “big city” is pretty much a matter of opinion. Over 1 million? Many have no major league team.

    • jeather 11:19 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      If we take urban area population (3.5 million) and look at US cities of that size, all of them have baseball teams. If we look just at the municipality (1.5 million), same thing.

      I don’t think that we need a baseball team at all, but it seems to be the case that Montreal is the biggest city in the US and Canada without an MLB team. Obviously if we include other countries in North America, Montreal doesn’t come close — Mexico City, Guatemala City, Havana, depending on how you define city (metro area etc), maybe Port-au-Prince and Santo Domingo. But people often incorrectly use North America to mean ‘US and Canada’.

    • Douglas 11:59 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Nobody here cares about Baseball.

    • Kate 12:06 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Bill Binns, the others may be what the Wikipedia calls “weasel words” but “one of the only” is simply illogical. Either something is the only one, or it’s not. It may be one of a few, or one of the rare, but as it stands it’s meaningless.

    • Ephraim 12:24 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Why does the public need to pay for one more disastrous stadium on the public purse? Don’t we already have one that is hardly in use. And when they talk about a use, they come out saying it can’t be used for that anyway. Hey, make it a PP… one less P… PUBLIC, you know…. a private partnership!

    • Josh 19:08 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      I think the reason for language like, “one of the only” is actually in jeather’s reply: It’s either that or list a bunch of caveats, taking up valuable real estate assuming these articles actually ran in hard copy newspapers.

    • carswell 22:53 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Boisvert is wrong. Coderre doesn’t have a passion for sports. He has a passion for big business spectator sports. Big difference.

    • Kate 09:07 on 2015/07/31 Permalink

      carswell, that sounds about right.

    • rue david 12:23 on 2015/07/31 Permalink

      man, where is the taxpayer backlash against wasting all this money? the return of the nordique will cost almost 500 million by the time it’s all done. half a billion dollars! quebec could have got a light rail line or two for that.

    • EmilyG 18:38 on 2015/07/31 Permalink

      I’m only a one-person backlash, so I don’t really count.
      I’m only against it because I think the money could be put to better use.

  • Kate 10:24 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    The Rogers Cup has lost one of its headliners as Roger Federer has pulled out of his appearance here. The men’s event begins here on August 10.

     
    • Joe Bin 18:28 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      They should call this edition the Rogerless Cup then.

  • Kate 10:22 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    The Coderre administration has changed tack and now says that more than one firm may provide electric cars for its car-sharing service.

     
    • Ephraim 12:26 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Frankly, just open it up based on a price per licence with each company getting a share of all the applications for licences. Then we can have competition between them. Each year on renewal, all companies apply get a share of the available licences based on their request. If the requests oversubscribe, the price increases next year for the licence.

  • Kate 10:18 on 2015/07/30 Permalink | Reply  

    Osheaga’s tenth anniversary festival opens tomorrow. The festival is sold out.

     
    • jeather 10:21 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Apparently the tickets were only mailed out this week, causing problems for people who were leaving for Montreal yesterday or today.

    • Ephraim 10:45 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      And the city hotels are also. Long weekend. PSG vs OL as well. Big weekend.

  • Kate 22:59 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    Brian Myles ponders the weight of the UPAC’s search of Gérald Tremblay’s house and cottage Wednesday and concludes that even if the man refrained from direct participation in city hall corruption, he still bears the responsibility of doing nothing to stop it.

     
  • Kate 22:44 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    Didier Drogba has arrived in Montreal. Youtube video.

     
  • Kate 22:43 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    The smart city? Apparently it’s nobody’s job to synchronize garbage pickup routes with road work, and this can cause traffic annoyances.

     
  • Kate 11:35 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    Leaving this federal riding map for Montreal island here for reference.

     
    • jeather 11:38 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      They’re really into getting rid of interesting historical riding names. Mine will be gone this election.

    • Kate 12:04 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Here’s the list of ridings and people who won in 2011:

      Ahuntsic – Maria Mourani, elected BQ, currently independent
      Bourassa – Denis Coderre, Liberal, replaced by Emmanuel Dubourg in 2013
      Hochelaga – Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet, NDP
      Honoré-Mercier – Paulina Ayala, NDP
      Jeanne-Le Ber – Tyrone Benskin, NDP
      La Pointe-de-l’Île – Ève Péclet, NDP
      Lac-Saint-Louis – Francis Scarpaleggia, Liberal
      LaSalle—Émard – Hélène Leblanc, NDP
      Laurier—Sainte-Marie – Hélène Laverdière, NDP
      Mount Royal – Irwin Cotler, Liberal
      NDG—Lachine – Isabelle Morin, NDP
      Outremont – Thomas Mulcair, NDP
      Papineau – Justin Trudeau, Liberal
      Pierrefonds—Dollard – Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe, NDP
      Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie – Alexandre Boulerice, NDP
      Saint-Laurent—Cartierville – Stéphane Dion, Liberal
      Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel – Massimo Pacetti, Liberal
      Westmount—Ville-Marie – Marc Garneau, Liberal

      This year this is the riding list :

      Ahuntsic-Cartierville
      Bourassa
      Dorval-Lachine-Lasalle
      Hochelaga
      Honoré-Mercier
      La Pointe-de-l’Île
      Lac Saint-Louis
      Lasalle-Émard-Verdun
      Laurier—Sainte-Marie
      Mount Royal
      NDG-Westmount
      Outremont
      Papineau
      Pierrefonds-Dollard
      Rosemont—La-Petite-Patrie
      Saint-Laurent
      Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel
      Ville-Marie—Sud-Ouest—Île des Sœurs

    • Ian 13:25 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      I’m in Mulcair’s riding, I expect no great surprises there.

    • John B 13:30 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Verdun’s a new riding. The NDP candidate is already pretty active. This should be fun!

    • Kate 13:36 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Odds that Justin Trudeau could lose in Papineau – where I live – aren’t great, especially given the initial NDP choice has already had to stand down. But you never know.

    • thomas 13:38 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      So Montreal is the only city in Canada with no ridings where the city name is part of the riding name?

    • jeather 14:47 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      The Liberal in my riding was wandering around early this month but was weirdly distant when I spoke to him. I don’t really know the NDP candidate either, though.

      I’m now in the same riding as my grandmother again.

    • Alex L 18:21 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Thomas, as Ville-Marie is the original name of this city, I guess it has one.

    • thomas 18:54 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      @Alex I suppose, but how many people across Canada would know that? Without looking a map an observer from outside Montreal might not appreciate Montreal’s political clout. As a point of comparison there are 10 federal ridings with the word Calgary.

    • Alison Cummins 19:24 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Possibly because Calgary is newish and those ridings never were much besides Calgary in the first place? Vs all the independent municipalities on the island of Montreal with long histories of their own?

      (Don’t know anything about Calgary. Hypothesizing in wild, unfettered ignorance.)

    • H.John 23:06 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      I can’t understand what the NDP were thinking. They’re scheduled to pick their candidate for the new riding on Aug 16th. If CBC is correct that will be two weeks after the election starts. Since it’s also a new riding, funds must be low or non-existant. Picking a candidate as soon as was possible would have allowed her or him to begin fundraising.

    • H.John 23:38 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      I probably should have mentioned I was talking about NDG-Westmount.

    • Clément 23:50 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      H.John: I thought Peter McQueen was running for NDP in our riding? Or is it not decided yet?

    • Michael Black 00:23 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      No, the NDP candidate has not been decided for the riding. Peter McQueen got early press, but almost as an aside the story went that Sue Montgomery and a former director of the Old Brewery Mission were also seeming the candidacy I think that’s all of them.

      At least they aren’t being parachuted in.

      Noah Richler is apparently running for the NDP in a Toronto riding.

      Michael

    • H.John 00:56 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      There are 7 listed candidates for the NDP nomination in NDG-Westmount:

      http://www.npdndgwest.ca

    • Kevin 08:55 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @H. John
      Two weeks of last-minute fundraising aren’t going to matter much in an 11-week campaign.
      Federally, the spending limit will be more than $60 million — which is less than the CPC is believed to have in the bank. In the past four years the NDP has managed to collect about $30 million in donations.

    • jeather 09:07 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      The spending proportional to campaign length is a horrible, horrible thing and I hope whoever wins next will shut that down. Doubling the minimum campaign is a terrifying thought.

    • H.John 09:29 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @Kevin the new ridings have been known for years. IIRC Marc Garneau was nominated as the candidate in the new riding for the Liberals more than a year ago. A year of fundraising could have helped.

    • H.John 09:35 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      To be exact, Garneau was nominated on April 6th, 2014.

    • H.John 10:14 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Historically, there have been a number of ridings that included the name Montreal. To name a few:

      MONTREAL CENTRE, Quebec (1867 – 1896)

      MONTREAL EAST, Quebec (1867 – 1896)

      MONTREAL WEST, Quebec (1867 – 1896)

      MONTREAL–BOURASSA, Quebec (1971 – 1979)

      MONTREAL–MERCIER, Quebec (1981 – 1988)

      MONTREAL–SAINTE MARIE, Quebec (1981 – 1988)

      In recent decades Elections Canada and the independent commissions established every ten years to redraw the boundary maps, have tried to simplify the names, and especially in urban centres to get away from city and town names. Riding boundaries often to not match those of the towns they contain.

      In 2002, the Quebec Commission proposed changing the name of NDG-Lachine to just Lachine. After issuing a preliminary report, the Commission heard submissions. Multiple submissions explained the historical importance of keeping NDG as part of the name. The Commission acquiesced but stunned participants by changing the riding boundaries in a major way that had not been suggested by the first report. The majority of NDG was removed from the riding (everything east of Hingston) and added to Westmount-Ville-Marie. The whole of Dorval was removed from Lac St-Louis and added to NDG-Lachine. Over the following years, Marlene Jennings received non-stop complaints from Dorval that their name was not included in the riding name. Surprisingly, no residents of Montreal West ever complained.

      The process allowed MPs, by private members bills, to change the riding names, but minority parliaments meant private members bills never got far enough along before the next election arrived.

      The recent Quebec Commission again recommended name changes using historical figures (e.g. John Peters Humphrey, the drafter of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to replace TMR) in their preliminary report (that map was posted here). Again the submissions were universally critical and the Commission backed down.

    • Kate 10:27 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      H. John, you’re right: three years ago I was posting about potential changes in the riding names that never materialized. This is the map showing those proposed ridings.

    • Kevin 11:00 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @H John
      That’s what I’m saying. It’s going to be the most expensive campaign ever, and the Conservatives have $2 for every dollar the NDP has.
      In addition, by calling an election now *third-party* ads have to come to a full stop.

      So fretting about the ramifications of a possible 2 weeks of fundraising in early August is pointless. If a candidate still has to raise cash after the election has been called, they’ve already lost.

    • H.John 11:30 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @Kevin I really don’t get where you think the difference is two weeks. The LPC nominated their candidate 15 months ago. The NDP could also have done it two years ago, thereby putting a human face to their candidate, who could have found their own volunteers and raised funds for 2 years – not 2 weeks.

    • Mark Côté 14:01 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Interesting, the current MP here in NDG (when it was NDG–Lachine), who displaced 40 years of Liberal governance, isn’t a candidate for the NDP in NDG–Westmount. I guess it’s not surprisingly, since I doubt anyone expected her to win the first time, so with the stakes higher, maybe they are replacing her with candidates with more experience or clout.

    • Kevin 14:18 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @H John: You first mentioned the NDP picking a candidate 2 weeks after the election, and I conflated that with your fundraising comment.

      @Mark Coté
      Isabelle Morin’s riding was chopped up and she’s running in the riding that has the biggest chunk of her votes from four years ago: Dorval-Lachine-Lasalle

    • Mark Côté 20:51 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Kevin: Ah okay, that makes some sense.

  • Kate 10:52 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    I like how Pierre-André Normandin ledes this story about cameras making parks safer: it’s purely the initiative of a security company that’s trying to make a sale. (The woman pushing the product is called Mme Sin!)

    Even Ian Lafrenière is quoted as saying cameras are not a solution and, anyway, you have to have a problem you need to fix first. Since a cop is saying this, I think it’s fair to assume our parks are not actually hotbeds of crime, for starters.

     
    • Duwon 13:57 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Police/Security routinely patrol parks during closing hours. I’ve been kicked out of a few parks for enjoying the late night herb. Even once had a fun cat and mouse game with Outremont security. He lost.

  • Kate 10:48 on 2015/07/29 Permalink | Reply  

    The latest lawyer representing Richard Henry Bain wants Bain’s trial postponed again, saying he hasn’t been able to find a psychiatrist to evaluate Bain’s state of mind.

     
    • ProposMontréal 15:37 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Seriously what will take to prison this man for a few dozen years ? He wounded a man, he cold blooded killed another and try to kill the prime minister of the province. that’s a crime, no matter which allegiance you are. it’s even caught on video damn it, how much more prrof do we need? Is it another case like Valery Fabrikant or the biker gangs playing the system ? If it’s the case, than the system is the issue.

      Was he in is right mind? that we’re not sure.

    • Kate 15:54 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      The trial, when it finally opens, will be like Luka Magnotta’s – more about whether the defendant was sane or not than the establishment of guilt.

    • Alison Cummins 19:27 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Well, sanity is part of the establishment of guilt. You need a guilty mind to be guilty.

      We know that Bain shot someone dead. What we don’t know is whether he’s guilty of murder. The former is a finding of fact, the latter a finding of the court.

    • ant6n 22:53 on 2015/07/29 Permalink

      Does time served still count like 1.5x?

    • Matt G 02:21 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

    • No\Deli 02:32 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      He wounded a man, he cold blooded killed another and try to kill the prime minister of the province. that’s a crime, no matter which allegiance you are.

      I’m sorry, but exactly which ‘allegiance’ would be inclined to gave Bain a pass? I’m really confused by that remark. I hope you’re not implying that some side of the sociopolitical divide feels such acts are not (potentially) criminal?

    • Ian 09:22 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Yeah, I’m pretty sure his political affiliations are less relevant than whether he can be considered legally sane or not. Irrelevant, actually. I have seen NOBODY argue that he isn’t responsible for political reasons; you are actually the first person I have ever seen bring it up. Nice straw man argument there. Worth noting, though, in English we say “Premier” of a province, “Prime Minister” is reserved for “Prime Minister of Canada”.

    • H.John 09:33 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @ant6n as Matt G points out the 1.5x still exists, but it’s at the discretion of the judge. It is not automatic.

    • Kate 09:36 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      ProposMontréal: please don’t think Bain is a hero to anybody, no matter how anglo or federalist. He’s a dangerous nutbar, and whichever way the court eventually decides on his sanity, he needs to be locked up.

    • nathan 09:41 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @ProposMontréal Prime Minister of the province? LOL

    • Kate 10:29 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      nathan, it isn’t LOL at all. It’s a translation from French and everyone else here understood him. Premiers are prime ministers, i.e. first ministers.

      Quoting Wikipedia: In Canada, a premier is the head of government of a province or territory. Though the word is merely a synonym for prime minister, it is employed for provincial prime ministers to differentiate them from the Prime Minister of Canada.

    • ProposMontréal 13:47 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      @ALL i’m quite happy to read your comments here. Read some of the comments on social media or on The Gazette’s website (I know I shouldn’t do this) but Bain is raised to hero status by some people. Even if someone would try to get to Harper or Trudeau at the next election, I would be disgusted by the situation.

      As for title error. Yes, in french “Premier Ministre” is the same title whether you are talking about the country or the province. I did do a literal transalation, not knowing there was a difference in english. Thank you for the ones who have showed me the mistake and for the ones who laughed, hope your french is as good as my english, spanish and portuguese.

    • CE 14:01 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      I seem to remember seeing “free Bain” graffiti around downtown a few weeks after the shooting. It might have been trolling but it’s not inconceivable that some people think what he did was justifiable based on some of the vitriol that was aimed at Marois and the PQ in general, especially on social media. Some of it was incredibly nasty, just awful things being said. And all written in English (although, often not very good English).

    • No\Deli 14:36 on 2015/07/30 Permalink

      Read some of the comments on social media or on The Gazette’s website … Bain is raised to hero status by some people.

      Really? Links, please?

      If such comments exist, I think of them as nothing more than digital graffiti (hat tip CE) not legitimately representative of any real part of the legitimate political discourse. Trolling. Amateur provocateurs, possibly.

      If you read such things, I’m disappointed you were unable to separate wheat from chaff. Or maybe it serves your worldview not to. Something to consider.

    • Alison Cummins 11:43 on 2015/07/31 Permalink

      No/Deli,
      We all consider ourselves to be the wheat, so that’s not very helpful. Crucially, chaff and wheat votes have the same weight. If more chaff votes then the chaff carries the day. If there genuinely are anglos who consider Bain a hero then we need to know that. Sometimes that means reading the comment threads (and gagging) and trying to figure out whether the commenters are numerically relevant.

      ProposMontreal,
      Kate’s commenters are pretty solidly wheat. With a handful of wild oats. No Bain supporters here. It’s a good community so people get insulted when your comments suggest that we’re an unpoliced rabble of idiots.

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